What’s Real in Real Estate?

What’s reality?

A higher value sale in the Miller Group Realty (MGR) target market was recently recorded. The MLS indicates it went under contract in only 11 days at 100% of the asking price. That’s pretty remarkable given the near shut-down of the housing market beginning mid-March due to the Covid-19 virus.

Detailed research, however, reveals a different story; i.e., the property had actually been on/off the market four times over the past 11 months, required 247 days to go under contract, and finally sold for 80% of the original list price. Continue reading “What’s Real in Real Estate?”

Who You Gonna Call?

Who You Gonna Call? is that highly recognizable refrain in the Ghostbusters theme song when there’s something strange in your neighborhood.

While the circumstances are hopefully different, the very same question arises when one is considering the sale of their home. Continue reading “Who You Gonna Call?”

Is This Your Home Selling Experience?

Is this your home selling experience, or what you imagine it to be?

Chaos. Uncertainty. Out of control. Beat down, or up. Bruised and abused. Neighbors watching intently. Turning on a dime to accommodate last minute showings. Falling over oneself to keep the house constantly showroom ready. Continue reading “Is This Your Home Selling Experience?”

“I Know My Way Around The Kitchen”

I know my way around the kitchen is often used to communicate ones cooking skills.

Likewise, I know the local area is commonly used by real estate agents to immediately connect with a prospective buyer or seller.

“Know” is vague and without more information it is impossible to grasp a cook’s or agent’s level of expertise. Both expressions could be used by someone being very humble about their high level accomplishments. On the other hand, the expressions could purposefully be nondescript hoping the other party will assume the best and what they want to hear. Continue reading ““I Know My Way Around The Kitchen””

Cobb County Tax Bill

As a reminder, homeowners have 45 days after receiving their Annual Notice of Assessment to file a written appeal. (The notice includes the deadline date.)

In case you were not aware, the county does make periodic onsite visits to update their  property record from which to more accurately determine fair market values and/or make other determinations. More information can be found at www.CobbAssessor.org.

Don’t rely on the county’s opinion of value when preparing to sell. A Realtor and/or appraisal are a better resource for determining the potential sale price.

Higher Value Walton High School Home Resale Stats

MillerGroupRealty.com is the home for higher value Walton High School home resale stats by price range in Dickerson Middle School and Dodgen Middle School and the four elementary schools of East Side, Mount Bethel, Sope Creek and Timber Ridge that feed them. The local MLS provides a number of market metrics but system design does not support the level of detail that is so important to homeowners living within the Walton High School attendance zone.

The most recent Walton High School numbers reveal the following: Continue reading “Higher Value Walton High School Home Resale Stats”

Know Your Obligations

Know your obligations. Put more bluntly, know the law. This applies to those selling a house with or without a listing agent. And, whatever advice is directed at sellers often applies to buyers, and vice versa.

The duty to disclose is a very important topic and was recently addressed by Seth Weissman, long time general counsel to the Georgia Association of Realtors. (Don’t take any action based on this information, instead seek legal advice from a real estate attorney.)

The featured image does not tell you much about the house and appears to say, “HERE IT IS!”, leaving it up to the buyer to find the good, bad and ugly. Notating that a property is being sold as-is and/or without a disclosure seems to be an all too common strategy among investors, heirs and even owner occupants to sidestep their obligation.

Sellers – Regardless of the circumstances or conditions of the sale the seller is legally obligated to report latent defects of which they are aware and which a buyer could not discover through a reasonable inspection.

With this understanding it may seem the way forward is clear. But what about when:

  • A seller does not want to disclose a latent defect because the previous owner who must have known did not disclose.
  • A seller disagrees with a pre-listing inspection or one produced by a buyer.
  • A seller receives but does not read the buyer’s inspection report.
  • A buyer ignores a seller’s instructions and sends the inspection report anyway.
  • A seller asks the listing agent not to divulge a material defect that is unlikely to be discovered.

Buyers – Conduct your due diligence or forever hold your peace! There is little to no chance of winning a case against a seller if the issue could have been discovered through a reasonable inspection of the property, including current and pending zoning, boundary lines, flood insurance rates, past insurance claims, city/county/state long range plans, sex offender whereabouts, etc.